TTUHSC Scientist Seeking Solution to Antibiotic Resistance

Novel Nanoantibiotics Kill Bacteria Without Harming Healthy Cells

Henry Liang, PhD

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than 2.8 million Americans experience antibiotic-resistant infections each year; more than 35,000 die from those infections.

To address this critical and worldwide public health issue, a team of researchers led by Hongjun (Henry) Liang, Ph.D., from the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) Department of Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics, recently investigated whether or not a series of novel nanoparticles can kill some of the pathogens that lead to human infection without affecting healthy cells.

The study, “Hydrophilic Nanoparticles that Kill Bacteria while Sparing Mammalian Cells Reveal the Antibiotic Role of Nanostructures,” was published Jan. 11 by Nature Communications. Other study members of the Liang team, all from TTUHSC, included Yunjiang Jiang, Ph.D., Wan Zheng, Ph.D., Keith Tran, Elizabeth Kamilar, Jitender Bariwal, Ph.D., and Hairong Ma, Ph.D.

Past research has shown that hydrophobicity (a molecule’s ability to repel water) and hydrophilicity (a molecule’s ability to attract and dissolve in water) affects cells; the more hydrophobic a substance is, the more adverse the reaction it will cause. However, Liang said, there is no quantitative standard for how much hydrophobicity is acceptable.

“Basically, you can kill bacteria when you increase hydrophobicity,” Liang said. “But it will also kill healthy cells, and we don't want that.”

Liang, PhD, standing with his team

For their study, the Liang team used novel hydrophilic nanoparticles known as nanoantibiotics that were developed by Liang’s laboratory. Structurally speaking, these novel nanoantibiotics resemble tiny hairy spheres, each composed of many hydrophilic polymer brushes grafted onto silica nanoparticles of different sizes.

These synthetic compounds, which Liang’s lab produces, are designed to kill bacteria via membrane disruptions like antimicrobial peptides do, but through a different mode of membrane remodeling that damages bacterial membranes and not mammalian cells. Antimicrobial peptides are a diverse class of amphipathic molecules (partially hydrophilic-partially hydrophobic), which occur naturally and serve as the first line of defense for all multicellular organisms. The direct use of antimicrobial peptides as antibiotics is limited by their stability and toxicity.

There have been other studies in which researchers grafted amphipathic molecules onto nanoparticles, and they too kill bacteria. However, Liang said the primary issue in using amphipathic molecules is that it becomes very difficult to strike the right balance between their hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity so that the toxicity of these molecules to our own cells is significantly reduced.

“In our case, we remove that uncertainty from the equation because we started with a hydrophilic polymer,” Liang pointed out. “The cytotoxicity of hydrophobic moieties is not a concern anymore. Those hydrophilic polymers by themselves, or the silica nanoparticles alone don’t kill bacteria; they have to be grafted onto the nanostructure to be able to kill bacteria. And so, this is the first important discovery.”

computer generated replica of nanoantibiotics

Nanoantibiotics developed by the Liang lab are tiny “hairy” spheres comprised of polymer brushes (blue) covalently grafted atop silica nanoparticles (black). Once they land on bacterial membranes (headgroups in green and white; hydrocarbon tails in golden), the bundled polymer brushes act as daggers to pierce the bacterial membranes.

The Liang team also discovered that the degree of antibiotic activity is affected by the size of the hairy spheres, which according to Liang is the second important discovery of this research. Those measuring 50 nanometers and below appear to be much more active than those whose size exceeds 50 nanometers. Liang said those measuring approximately 10 nanometers appear to be the most active. (Using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering and other methods, the Liang team is able to interpret the molecular mechanism of the size-dependent antibiotic activity.)

These discoveries are important because using nanoantibiotics to kill bacteria evades all known mechanisms of bacterial resistance unless bacteria completely revamp their pathways for making cell membranes, which Liang said is unlikely.

“It is also nearly impossible for bacteria to develop new resistance against the nanoantibiotics,” Liang emphasized. “Furthermore, this discovery illuminates a blueprint to develop new antibiotics that would kill bacteria upon contact, but remain amiable to humans because they are produced using non-toxic and environmentally friendly ingredients via nanoengineering.”

Related Stories

TTUHSC’s Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Hosts Student Research Week

The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences hosted its 34th Annual Student Research Week March 8-11.

TTUHSC Researcher Receives NIH Grant to Study Vulnerabilities in Specific Cancer Types

The National Cancer Institute awarded a five-year, $1.9 million grant to C. Patrick Reynolds, M.D., Ph.D., director for the School of Medicine Cancer Center at TTUHSC.

The Hype Around Artificial Intelligence

Richard Greenhill, DHA, FISQua, FACHE, discusses the hype and reality surrounding AI in healthcare.

Recent Stories

Education

A Sixth School for a Brighter Future

On June 29, the opening celebration event for the Julia Jones Matthews School of Population and Public Health will recognize many years of hard work and look ahead to the start of a new and exciting journey.

Education

TTUHSC School of Nursing’s Ashcraft Named Fellow for the Gerontological Society of America

The GSA awarded fellow status to Alyce S. Ashcraft, Ph.D., RN, professor and associate dean for research and scholarship at TTUHSC.

Research

Uterine Cancer On the Rise Highlighting Drastic Disparities Among Black and Hispanic/LatinX Women

Cancer experts are ringing alarm bells due to the rise in uterine cancer. Numbers of uterine cancer annually are now equal to ovarian cancer.