Celebrating Black History Month: Faculty Spotlight

TTUHSC School of Medicine spotlights two accomplished faculty members

Dr. McLaurin-Jiang

Skye McLaurin-Jiang, MD, MPH, FAAP

Skye McLaurin-Jiang, MD, MPH, FAAP grew up in Amarillo, TX and returned in 2020 to begin her first faculty appointment in her hometown as an Assistant Professor at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine (TTUHSC SOM), Department of Pediatrics.

In 2010, Dr. McLaurin-Jiang graduated Summa Cum Laude from Texas Tech University with a Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry, and in 2014 from medical school at TTUHSC SOM. She completed her pediatric residency at Wake Forest University, as well as a T32 Primary Care Research Fellowship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. During her fellowship, she practiced as a pediatric hospitalist and completed a Master’s in Public Health concentrating in Health Policy and Management at the UNC Gilling’s School of Public Health. 

“During Black History Month, I am more mindful about the contributions our ancestors have made to the fabric of our society.”

Skyler McLaurin-Jiang, MD, MPH, FAAP

In 2019 she received the American Pediatric Association Annual RAPID Mentoring and Career Development Award, and in 2021 the TTUHSC SOM Dean’s Clinical Teaching Award. She is board certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. 

Dr. McLaurin-Jiang focuses her clinical efforts to providing inpatient pediatric care. She says “TTUHSC has allowed me the opportunity to pursue novel ways to impact patient outcomes. For instance, we are partnering with numerous community agencies in a novel study that explores whether nutritious, tailored meals for individuals with food insecurity help address disparities in maternal mental health and well-being.”

She also identifies as a health services researcher focused on enhancing systems fostering equity in maternal and infant outcomes. In addition to these roles, Dr. McLaurin-Jiang serves actively on the TTUHSC SOM Institutional Review Board (IRB) and on the editorial board of Panhandle Health Magazine. In her spare time, she enjoys running and hiking in Palo Duro Canyon with her family, and supporting her two children with their music interests. 

Dr. McLaurin-Jiang shares the importance of Black History month with her children:

“Through ordinary conversations. For instance, I may talk to them about Dr. Andrea Hayes-Jordan—the first Pediatric Surgeon who was black and female, and who faced numerous obstacles along her career path. These everyday conversations contribute to the scaffolding upon which my children’s own self-image and power is built.

Often, individuals of color are not at the forefront of history books, nor do they always have scientific discoveries or major buildings named after them. Therefore, Black History Month is one way we can be more intentional about elevating the contributions of our Black citizens. Finally, this month reminds me to be more mindful about recognizing one another’s contributions in the present moment.”

Dr. Stephanie L. Moses

Stephanie L. Moses, Ph.D.

Stephanie L. Moses, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Texas Tech University Health Science Center (TTUHSC) School of Medicine (SOM) Department of Family Medicine in the Permian Basin. She graduated from The University of Texas at Austin with a Bachelor’s Degree in Liberal Arts and a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology.

Dr. Moses joined TTUHSC in 2008 and has held several administrative positions, including Psychiatry Clerkship Director, Assistant Dean of Graduate Medical Education, and Assistant Dean of Faculty Development and Continuing Medical Education.

Dr. Moses currently serves as the Program Director of the Family Medicine Mental Health Fellowship; a fellowship created and implemented by her in order to train mental health clinicians alongside primary care physicians. In addition to her academic positions, she has an active clinical clientele with a special focus on women’s health and racial and ethnic disparities in mental health care.

“This is OUR History; not just for Black Americans but for all Americans.”

Stephanie Moses, Ph.D.

In 2018, the city of Odessa presented her with the “Odessa Under 40 Award” which honors individuals under the age of 40 who excel in their professions and contribute to the Odessa community. Dr. Moses received the TTUHSC SOM Dean’s Clinical Teaching Award (2011), the TTUHSC Visionary Award Coin (2020) and was a TTUHSC One Team Fellow (2020).

Dr. Moses has engaged in speaking engagements on a variety of topics focusing on mental health, diversity and cultural awareness, and leadership. Her passion is reducing the stigma of mental health. Dr. Moses has recently authored a fictional book detailing the impact of living with untreated mental health conditions. 

Dr. Moses says that Black History Month is highlighted “to show the contributions that Black Americans have made throughout history to make America what it is now. Highlighting the success of Black Americans gives generations present and those to come, the path to continue to invest in our progression as a country.  The history is important to educate and emphasize that this is OUR America and together we continue to make it better.”

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