Noted Neglected Tropical Disease Expert Visits TTUHSC
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Noted Neglected Tropical Disease Expert Visits TTUHSC

Peter J. Hotez, M.D., Ph.D., co-founded the Global Network for NTDs to provide access to essential medicines for millions of people worldwide.

Written by Beth Phillips

Hotez is founding dean of the Baylor College of Medicine National School of Tropical Medicine.

Hotez is founding dean of the Baylor College of Medicine National School of Tropical Medicine.

The Global Health Lecture Series recently featured Peter J. Hotez, M.D., Ph.D., with Baylor College of Medicine, presenting, “The NTDs, Blue Marble Health, and the Antipoverty Vaccines.”

Neglected diseases (NTDs) are a group of tropical infections that are endemic in low-income populations in developing regions of Africa, Asia and the Americas. There are 17 neglected tropical diseases recognized by the World Health Organization, including rabies, the Dengue virus and Leprosy.

Hotez is a scientist, pediatrician and leading advocate and expert in the fields of global health, vaccinology and NTDs control. He serves as founding dean of the Baylor College of Medicine National School of Tropical Medicine and holds the Texas Children’s Hospital Endowed Chair in Tropical Pediatrics. He is the Baker Institute fellow in disease and poverty at Rice University.

Hotez co-founded the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases to provide access to essential medicines for millions of people worldwide. In addition to his duties at Baylor College of Medicine, Hotez also serves as president of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, headquartered in Washington, D.C., and leads the Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development. Hotez is a member of the National Academy of Medicine. He has served on the Councils of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and Fogarty International.

This presentation was co-sponsored by the Center for Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases and the Office of Global Health. The ongoing lecture series highlights issues related to global health and building healthy communities.

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