Students Show Kids They’re Born to Ride
masthead

Students Show Kids They’re Born to Ride

The South Plains Autism Network brings children and their families together for a day of bike riding fun.

Written by Beth Phillips

SPAN provides a valuable support network for West Texas families affected by autism.

SPAN provides a valuable support network for West Texas families affected by autism.

The School of Allied Health Sciences’ South Plains Autism Network (SPAN) at the Speech-Language and Hearing Clinic recently celebrated the start of the school year with a bike rodeo.

At the event, students from the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences collaborated with occupational therapy and exercise and sports sciences students to provide activities for children in the SPAN program while their parents attended an informative meeting.

The students used instructional tips from Bike New York’s program to help children in SPAN learn to ride bicycles or tricycles.

SPAN provides critical services and a support network for West Texas families who have children with autism. Although there is no known cure for autism, studies show that early diagnosis and intervention lead to vastly improved outcomes. SPAN professionals assist families with early diagnosis, treatment and support through educational seminars, group support meetings, a loaner library, and help navigating community resources.

Gallery

Check out more pictures from the bike rodeo on Flickr.

FacebookTwitterLinkedInShare

Story produced by the Office of Communications and Marketing, (806) 743-2143.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

School of Allied Health Sciences
School of Allied Health Sciences

From its first class of 18 students in 1983, the School of Allied Health Sciences has grown steadily over the past 25 years. With campuses in Amarillo, Lubbock, Midland and Odessa, the school now serves more than 900 students enrolled in 18 degree programs at the doctoral, masters and baccalaureate degree levels.

The school has a groundbreaking history from offering the first Doctor of Audiology program west of the Mississippi, to having the first Master of Science in Molecular Pathology in the country.

Connect with them on .