Breastfeeding Bonds El Paso and Ciudad Juarez
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Breastfeeding Bonds El Paso and Ciudad Juarez

Latin America’s first baby café is open and ready serve breastfeeding mothers.

Written by Lisa Ruley

The Baby Cafe de Ciudad Juarez in the Sede Hospital General, led by Director Dra. Juana Trejo Franco, is the first of its kind in Latin America.

The Baby Cafe de Ciudad Juarez in the Sede Hospital General, led by Director Dr. Juana Trejo Franco, is the first of its kind in Latin America.

Breastfeeding mothers in Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, now have a new resource for finding support and answers to important questions regarding lactation.

The Baby Café de Ciudad Juarez in the Sede Hospital General de Zona No 6 Cd. (Pronaf Center) opened its doors earlier this month. The baby café, led by Director Dr. Juana Trejo Franco, is the first of its kind in Latin America. The facility is modeled after the El Paso Baby Café® at the Gayle Greve Hunt School of Nursing.

The El Paso Baby Café® and the Baby Café de Ciudad Juarez serve the needs of women who are breastfeeding and mothers interested in breastfeeding their children. The baby cafés are free drop-in centers open three times a week.

At the baby cafés, mothers support each other and lactation professionals are always available to offer advice. The idea for the facilities is predicated on evidence that breastfed babies have a significantly lower risk of becoming obese later in life. One of the top objectives of the baby cafés is to normalize breastfeeding.

Studies have also shown that breastfeeding offers additional benefits including a lower risk of Type 2 diabetes for both mom and baby. In addition, researchers at the University of Durham in the United Kingdom recently found that brain size may be linked to the amount of time a mother breastfeeds her baby.

The El Paso Baby Café® was the second to open in the U.S., and is modeled after a similar facility in the U.K. Both baby cafés are licensed under the umbrella organization of The Baby Café Charitable Trust, U.K.

The El Paso Baby Café® is a community partner of the Gayle Greve Hunt School of Nursing. Other partners include: University Medical Center of El Paso; Texas Department of State Health Services-Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity Prevention Program; El Paso City-County Health, Women, Infants and Children; El Paso First HealthPlans Inc.; Superior HealthPlan; Southwest Area Breastfeeding Advocates; The Paso del Norte Health Foundation-Begin at Birth Initiative; ESC Region 19 Early Head Start; AVANCE – El Paso; March of Dimes; Laura W. Bush Institute for Women’s Health; and Univision Channel 26.

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Story produced by the Office of Communications and Marketing, (806) 743-2143.


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El Paso Campus
El Paso Campus

TTUHSC at El Paso houses the Paul L. Foster School of Medicine and the Gayle Greve Hunt School of Nursing.

As the only medical school on the U.S./Mexico border, the school offers students a rich learning environment and, by 2013, is expected to further the local economy by $1.31 billion. Since 1973, El Paso students have gained experience in infectious diseases, diabetes, migrant health and community-oriented primary care.

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Gayle Greve Hunt School of Nursing
Gayle Greve Hunt School of Nursing

The Gayle Greve Hunt School of Nursing is located in El Paso.

The Hunt Family Foundation donated a $10 million gift to the Texas Tech University System. The donation was used to develop the autonomous, fully-accredited Hunt School of Nursing on the Texas/Mexico border.

The school admitted its first class of Traditional BSN students in fall 2011, followed by a class of Second Degree BSN students in spring 2012. Administrators anticipate the school will grow to 300 students in five years to counteract the long-term nursing shortage in the medically underserved El Paso region.