Chancellor’s Council Recognizes Texas Tech University System’s Top Faculty

Chancellor Robert Duncan presented teaching and research awards to esteemed faculty throughout the Texas Tech University System.

Award Winners

Texas Tech University System Chancellor Robert Duncan recently recognized 14 faculty members from the system’s four component institutions as recipients of the 2018 Chancellor’s Council Distinguished Teaching and Research Awards. These awards recognize excellence in academics and research, and are the most prestigious honors granted to faculty members throughout the TTU System.

“The quality academic experience available to our students in the Texas Tech University System is a direct result of the hard work, commitment and dedication of our faculty members,” Duncan said. “They pursue groundbreaking, impactful research and guide our students in reaching new heights of excellence. On behalf of our institutions, it is an honor and a privilege to recognize our world-class faculty.”

The awards are made possible through philanthropic gifts to the Chancellor’s Council, which recognizes top teaching and research faculty across the Texas Tech University System. Since the teaching and research awards were established by the council in 2001, 165 faculty have received awards totaling $1,035,000.

The Chancellor’s Council was originally created in 1967 as the President’s Council to recognize donors who helped Texas Tech University accomplish its highest goals. The program was renamed and expanded in 1996 with the establishment of the Texas Tech University System. Today, the Chancellor’s Council plays a vital role in creating opportunities for all four universities. The council supports student scholarships, faculty awards and top scholar recruitment.

Award recipients each receive a $5,000 stipend and an engraved medallion.

Those recognized for teaching excellence at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center were:

Eric J. MacLaughlin, Pharm.D

Dr. MacLaughlin is a professor and chair of the Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, and a clinical professor in the departments of Family Medicine and Internal Medicine, School of Medicine.

His practice specialty is family medicine and he is an expert in the management of hypertension. His teaching, practice, and research focus are in the area of chronic cardiovascular diseases, especially high blood pressure and team-based care. He is an author and the only pharmacist on the 2017 national guidelines for the treatment of high blood pressure in adults recently released by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology.

Dr. MacLaughlin has been the recipient of numerous teaching awards, including the President’s Excellence in Teaching Award, Most Influential Professor Award and 10 additional School of Pharmacy teacher or teaching team of the year awards. 

He received his bachelor’s degree in pharmacy from Albany College of Pharmacy, Pharm.D. from Medical University of South Carolina and completed a Primary Care Specialty Residency at the University of Colorado.

Simon C. Williams, Ph.D.

Simon Williams is an associate professor in the Department of Medical Education and associate dean for Academic Affairs, School of Medicine. 

He joined TTUHSC in 1995. His research interests focused on the genetics of human leukemia, regulation of male reproduction and molecular interactions between pathogenic bacteria and human cells. After several years as a successful researcher, he changed career focus to education and administration, and greatly contributed to innovative initiatives such as the three-year accelerated track for students interested in careers in family medicine. Williams played a major role in guiding the School of Medicine through two successful accreditation cycles by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education. In recognition of this, he received the Distinguished Service Award from the School of Medicine in 2008 and was appointed University Distinguished Faculty in 2015.

Williams was born in Dublin, Ireland and completed a bachelor’s degree in genetics at Trinity College, Dublin. He began a doctorate program at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, a component institution of the State University of Buffalo, New York. In 1990, he completed a degree in cellular and molecular biology and went on to postdoctoral training in the area of gene regulation and cancer at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, Maryland. 

Those recognized for research excellence at TTUHSC were:

Kendra P. Rumbaugh, Ph.D.

Rumbaugh is an associate professor in the Department of Surgery, with joint appointments in the departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry and Immunology & Molecular Microbiology.

Her research focuses on understanding and treating wound infections, and she is especially interested in how biofilms, polymicrobial interactions and cell-to-cell signaling contribute to infection. Rumbaugh’s research has been consistently funded, receiving approximately $2.5 million in extramural awards, over the last 10 years. She has served on organizing committees or as a session chair and invited speaker at several national and international conferences.

Rumbaugh received a bachelor’s degree in microbiology from the University of Texas at El Paso. She attended graduate school at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, where her doctoral work focused on the role of quorum sensing in the pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After receiving her doctorate in medical microbiology, Rumbaugh did postdoctoral training at the University of California at San Francisco.

Phil S. Sizer, P.T., Ph.D.

Sizer is an associate dean for Research and ScD Program Director in the School of Health Professions.

His primary research interests include clinical pathoanatomy, sensorimotor control and functional biomechanics of the spine and extremities, as well as tissue and movement screening. Sizer has lectured at more than 400 national and international courses and conferences in musculoskeletal pathoanatomy, diagnostics and management, sensorimotor control and pain science. He also serves as the director of the Clinical Musculoskeletal Research Laboratory, as well as senior faculty in the Rehabilitation Sciences and Medical Pain Fellowship programs.

Sizer received a bachelor’s degree in physical therapy from University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, as well as a master’s degree in exercise science and a doctorate with a motor control emphasis from Texas Tech University. He is a President’s Distinguished Professor.

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F. Marie Hall Institute for Rural and Community Health

In 2001, TTUHSC received a $1 million annual state funding appropriation to support the Office of Rural and Community Health. In 2006, the office received one of the largest private donations in TTUHSC history, creating the F. Marie Hall Institute for Rural and Community Health and TTUHSC’s rural–focused outreach, workforce and research initiatives. The institute serves as the primary liaison with communities across the 108–county TTUHSC service area. These community partnerships provide both the framework and the mechanism for achieving the mission of improving the health of West Texans.